Nortel Networks Institute Distinguished Seminar Series
(NNIDSS) :: Talks (year 2003)


 


All talks index :: 2003

Notes: Everyone is welcome.

2003

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Date: Thursday November 27, 2003
Title: WiFi Industry and Technology Analysis
By: Alberto Leon-Garcia
University of Toronto

 

and Tony Yuen
University of Toronto
Venue: MC 5158, Math Building, University of Waterloo
Time: 10:00 am to 11:30 am
Abstract of the Talk WiFi technology and "hotspots" have generated much attention in both the IT and telecom industries. The IEEE 802.11 wireless LAN has already found a place in homes. The enterprise and Public Wireless LAN service (PWLAN) are viewed as subsequent targets. This talk will present the results of a Wi-Fi Industry Analysis. We will present a model for analyzing the Wi-Fi value chain and we will examine the technical and business aspects of Components, Equipment, and Service Providers. We will provide observations on the strategies pursued by component manufacturers and identify possible scenarios in the evolution of the enterprise and PWLAN markets. We will also discuss key networking issues associated with WiFi deployment.
Presentation's PowerPoint File Not available for this talk.
Biographies Alberto Leon-Garcia is the first holder of the Nortel Chair in Network Architecture and Services. He is Co-Director and founder of the Master of Engineering in Telecommunications program at the University of Toronto. He is a Fellow of the IEEE "For contributions to multiplexing and switching of integrated services traffic". Professor Leon-Garcia was founder and CTO of AcceLight Networks in Ottawa which developed leading edge optical switching equipment. He holds several patents and has published research extensively in the areas of switch architecture and traffic management. He is author of Probability and Random Processes for Electrical Engineering and of Communication Networks: Fundamental Concepts and Key Architecture.

Tony Yuen is presently Co-Director of the Master Degree of Telecommunications (MET) Program within the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Toronto. He was appointed to that position in July 2000. He is also an Advisory Board Member of the Dean's Advisory Board of the faculty of Engineering. Tony retired from Nortel Networks at the end of 2000, where he has been with the company for 28 years in various senior management positions from 1983 onwards. Since 1999, he received a joint-appointment and served as Adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Engineering and the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto, where he teaches the Strategic Management of Telecommunications and Information Technology at the Graduate Schools. Tony also gives special lectures in the Executive MBA and Executive Development Programs at the Ivey Business School. His current research areas include Management of Innovation and New Technologies, the Convergence of the IT/Telecom/Internet Industries and New Communication Network Architectures and Services.

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Date: Friday October  31, 2003
Title: Cooperative Communication In Wireless Networks
By: Aria Nosratinia, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas
Venue: Davis Centre, University of Waterloo, DC 1304
Time: 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Abstract of the Talk User cooperation is a method to achieve transmit diversity in cases where mobiles cannot support multiple antennas. Cooperation involves two single-antenna users forming a partnership, where each mobile achieves space-time diversity by using their partner's antenna as a relay. We propose a new framework, called coded cooperation, where cooperation is achieved through channel coding methods instead of a direct relay or repetition. Each codeword is partitioned into two subsets that are transmitted from the user's and partner's antennas, respectively. Coded cooperation achieves impressive gains compared to a non-cooperative system while maintaining the same information rate, transmit power, and bandwidth. Coded cooperation can be realized with block or convolutional codes, and with various methods of partitioning, e.g., puncturing, product codes, parallel or serial concatenation. Compared to relay (repetition) cooperative systems, coded cooperation has many advantages, including better performance especially at moderate Eb/No and non-reliance on inter-user channel state information. We have developed tight bounds on the error rate and demonstrate performance in quasi-static as well as fast fading. Time permitting, I will briefly discuss extensions of coded cooperation, including Turbo coded cooperation and space-time coded cooperation.
Presentation's File Enriched with speaker's original talk in audio (large PPT file, size: 28 MB)
Enriched with speaker's original talk in audio (smaller ZIP file, size: 16 MB)
Question/Answer period's audio (large MP3 file, size: 22 MB)

Instructions: Note that Microsoft Power Point will change the slides automatically synchronous with the added voice (you can also switch between the slides and repeat them as you like). Run Power Point in "full screen display" if you want to save and run the file on your own computer, otherwise it should run automatically. Note that if you want to run the file from its original location (rather than saving it on your own computer and run it locally), you may experience some delay in the transition between slides.

Biography Aria Nosratinia received his Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1996. During the academic year 1995-96, he was with Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey. From 1996 to 1999, he was a visiting professor and faculty fellow at Rice University, Houston, Texas. Since July 1999, he has been on the faculty of the University of Texas at Dallas, where he is currently Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. Dr. Nosratinia's interests lie in the broad area of information theory, coding, and signal processing, in particular coding and communication of multimedia signals. He received the National Science Foundation career award in January 2000. He is associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Image Processing.

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Date: Tuesday, October 28, 2003
Title: Next Generation Broadband Wireless Access
By: Peiying Zhu, Wireless Technology Lab, Nortel Networks
Venue: Davis Centre, University of Waterloo, DC 1304
Time: 10:30 to 12:00 pm
Abstract of the Talk Broadband access represents a major driver for the next generation wireless access technologies. Highly spectral efficient technology becomes a fundamental enabler for both macro-cellular and short range wireless access networking.
In this talk, we present a view of the evolution towards a new generation wireless cellular network and its enabling technologies, challenges and practical hurdles. A brief presentation is given on our research activities in this area, with emphasis on advanced MIMO-OFDM. Finally we present our view on the emerging new technologies and their potential to shift the paradigm of the next generation wireless access network.
Presentation's PDF File This presentation's file can NOT be posted online due to Nortel's copyright laws.
Biography Peiying Zhu obtained her Ph.D in 1992 from Concordia University, Montreal, Canada. She jointed Wireless Technology Lab, Nortel Networks in 1998, and worked on the 3G CDMA prototype. She is currently managing a team working on next generation wireless air interface research and prototyping. Prior joining Nortel Networks, she worked for various other companies on Video Conferencing and Robotic Vision. Her current research interests are on MIMO, OFDM and MAC layer protocols. She holds numerous patents in these areas.

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Date: Thursday, October 16, 2003
Title: Infrastructure for Tetherless Computing
By: Srinivasan Keshav, School of Computer Science, University of Waterloo
Venue: Davis Centre, University of Waterloo, DC 1304
Time: 2:00 to 3:30 pm
Abstract of the Talk In the near future, client applications running on ubiquitous devices, such as Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), Radio Frequency ID (RFID) tag readers, and mobile telephones, will maintain intermittent and heterogeneously administered wireless connectivity with back-end services running on powerful data stores and compute engines. “Tetherless Computing” brings these elements together to allow novel classes of applications, such as:
  • User-centric and geographically-aware clients that offload processing to back-end servers.
  • Services that aggregate and coordinate information collected by a large number of edge clients to form a single query-able 'global state'.

While the elements of tetherless computing are either in place or rapidly becoming available, device capabilities (such as compute capacity, memory size, disk speeds) greatly outstrip the system capabilities (such as security, availability, and privacy) required by end-users and applications. What is missing is a reliable and seamless tetherless computing infrastructure that users can trust with their data, their computing needs, and in some cases, their life. In this talk I will explore the challenges in making tetherless computing infrastructure reliable, seamless, secure, scalable, and with the best possible performance.

 

Presentation's PDF File
Presentation's PowerPoint File Enriched with speaker's original talk in audio (large PPT file, size: 27.2 MB)

Instructions: Note that Microsoft Power Point will change the slides automatically synchronous with the added voice (you can also switch between the slides and repeat them as you like). Run Power Point in "full screen display" if you want to save and run the file on your own computer, otherwise it should run automatically. Note that if you want to run the file from its original location (rather than saving it on your own computer and run it locally), you may experience some delay in the transition between slides.

Biography S. Keshav is an Associate Professor in the School of Computer Science, University of Waterloo. In prior lives, he was a researcher at Bell Labs, a professor at Cornell, and a co-founder of Ensim Corporation: a Silicon Valley startup that, despite his presence and active participation, is still alive. His past work has ranged from scheduling and flow control to network simulation, cryptographic protocols, and telepresence. His current interests are in infrastructural issues underlying tetherless computing.

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Date: Monday, October 6, 2003
Title: Fountain Codes
By: Amin Shokrollahi, School of Computer & Communication Sciences, Ecole Polytechnique Federale (EPFL), Lausanne
Venue: Davis Centre, University of Waterloo, DC 1302
Time: 10:30 am to 12:00 pm (noon)
Abstract of the Talk Fountain Codes constitute a new class of truly variable rate codes. For a given vector of k input symbols, a Fountain Code produces a potentially limitless stream of output symbols. Output symbols are generated independently and at random. Good Fountain Codes have the property that the input symbols can be recovered from a close-to-optimal number of output symbols. In this talk I will introduce two classes of efficient Fountain Codes and will exhibit codes in these classes that achieve the capacity of any erasure channel. I will also talk about Fountain Codes on channels other than the erasure channel and discuss some very recent results about their performance.
Presentation's PDF File
Biography Amin Shokrollahi finished his PhD in 1991 in Bonn. His thesis dealt with applications of coding theory in general, and algebraic geometric codes in particular to algebraic complexity theory. After four years of assistant professorship in Bonn, he joined the International Computer Science Institute (ICSI) in Berkeley as a researcher, and spent three years in Berkeley, working jointly with ICSI and UC Berkeley. In 1998 he joined the
Mathematical Sciences Research Center of the Bell Laboratories in New Jersey as a Member of Technical Staff. In 2000 he joined the startup Digital Fountain as their Chief Scientist. In January 2003 he joined the departments of Computer Science and Mathematics of the Ecole Polytechnique Federale (EPFL) in Lausanne. Amin's interests include computational number theory and algebra, coding theory, theoretical computer science, communications, and networking. He is the author of several books and research papers on these subjects. Amin has received a number of awards and recognitions, including the Information Theory Society Best Paper Award in 2002.

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Date: Wednesday, September 24, 2003
Title: Diversity and Freedom: A Fundamental Tradeoff in Wireless Systems
By: David Tse, Dept. of EECS, U.C. Berkeley
Venue: Davis Centre, University of Waterloo, DC 1302
Time: 10:30 am to 12:00 pm (noon)
Abstract of the Talk The amount of diversity and the total number of degrees of freedom are two important resources in a wireless system. Traditionally they have been considered in isolation. We propose the point of view of describing the performance of communication schemes as a tradeoff between the amounts of these two resources actually utilized. The optimal tradeoff achievable by any scheme provides then a fundamental benchmark with respect to which actual schemes can be judged. We give several examples on which this framework can be applied: 1) point-to-point MIMO links, 2) multiple access MIMO channels, 3) cooperative relaying systems.
Presentation's PDF File
Biography David Tse received the B.A.Sc. degree in systems design engineering from University of Waterloo, Canada in 1989, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1991 and 1994 respectively. From 1994 to 1995, he was a postdoctoral member of technical staff at A.T.& T. Bell Laboratories. Since 1995, he has been at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences in the University of California at Berkeley, where he is currently a Professor. He received a 1967 NSERC 4-year graduate fellowship from the government of Canada in 1989, a NSF CAREER award in 1998, the Best Paper Awards at the Infocom 1998 and Infocom 2001 conferences, the Erlang Prize in 2000 from the INFORMS Applied Probability Society, the IEEE Communications and Information Theory Society Joint Paper Award in 2001, and the Information Theory Society Best Paper Award in 2003. He is currently an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory. His research interests are in information theory, wireless communications and networking.

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